Chagrin Falls teachers confiscate phones before class

phone+pockets+in+Mr.Kasees+room%2C+photo+by+Ava+Rose

phone pockets in Mr.Kasee’s room, photo by Ava Rose

Phone pockets have taken schools across the country by storm. Chagrin students are seeing them crop up more and more in classes, becoming a staple for many classrooms.

Phone pockets, also called phone holders, are grids where students can easily put away their phones and take them out before and after class.

While originally only one teacher used them, they’ve become more prevalent, with more and more teachers slowly beginning to use them over the years. 

While teachers have different reasons, these pockets are mostly being used to help teachers keep the attention of students.

“It was kind of a battle all last year, a battle for attention, and, you know, you get tired of fighting the battle so I just decided this would be much easier,” said CFHS science teacher Mrs. Christine Deighan.

Mrs. Deighan started using these pockets this school year, adding them to the science rooms shared between all the teachers in the wing.

Limiting distraction doesn’t have to be the only goal.

“We sit next to each other and we don’t talk to each other, we don’t talk to each other, so now you’re forced to communicate with the people around you,” said Mrs. Deighan.

While allowing people to contact whoever they want comes with advantages, particularly for those with trouble meeting new people, this conversation allows groups to feel more connected in class.

Phone pockets are not without consequences, though. 

“I have anxiety and my phone is kind of a crutch for me, so not having it in my lap is a little nerve-wracking but other than that it’s not really a big deal,” said CFHS junior Zoe Jones.

In the modern world where phones are not only the primary way many people contact each other, but are also incredibly useful emergency devices, anxiety from not having it within reach is the natural growing pain of using phone pockets.

Over time, people tend to grow more comfortable without their phones.

“I’ve heard some people say in the past they are relieved a little bit when the teacher makes them turn in their phones because they know they can’t touch it for the period,” said Mrs. Deighan.

Given the important role phones have, the risk of losing it could also end up being impactful.

“It’s slightly annoying that I just have to put my phone there and take it out before and after class, but I guess I understand why they have to do it because some students are kind of disrespectful with the phones during class,” said Zoe Jones.

This change in routine has left some forgetting their phones in class, though this hasn’t caused too much of an issue so far, with most students arriving on time regardless.

Some teachers have found success in limiting distractions.

“It doesn’t really affect the learning. though, all things considered, when you look at other students, they definitely have their phones out a lot less as it eliminates that possibility,” said CFHS junior Luke Nelson.

Much of Nelson’s experience with these pockets comes from excel tech, where all four of his medically-focused classes use it.

Much of this relief comes back to incentivising talking to each other.

“It promotes communication by eliminating distractions. Some people will hop on their phones and not converse or just not pay attention in class. having that pocket there not only promotes participation in class, but also promotes conversation in class,” said Nelson.