Students Learning More about The World Through UN Club

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This year, Chagrin Falls High School approved the creation of a Model United Nations Club.

The club is based on the international governing body, United Nations, and its members debate global issues that would be discussed by world leaders. The club usually meets one Tuesday per month after school, and every other Thursday during Tiger Period.

Model UN provides an engaging atmosphere for people who have different levels of understanding about world events. The members think critically about world issues and find the best way to solve them.

Sophomore Jack Ferenczy is the founder of the Model UN club and said he wanted people to share the same interest that he had for a long time.

“I find it interesting to debate world issues that impact our daily lives,” he said. “I hoped that other students could see the value in this, too.”

Junior Mary Mahoney is a participant in Model UN club and enjoys the club’s concept.

“I really like Model UN so far,” she said. “The best part is getting to hang out with friends and talk about solutions to important world issues.”

Many participants like Mahoney have become better friends one another, and are always open to hearing other members’ ideas. They are well-led and can have strong discussions without much intervention.

Ms. Powers, who teaches US History and AP Economics, serves as the adviser of this club. She said she is happy to see students debating global issues.

“Model UN and the UN itself have been interesting to me for a long time, and I think that students being interested in global issues – especially today – is very important,” she said.  

Additionally, she reported that the club has had successes early on.

“The club has been going well as of now, but we need more members to join,” she said. “We currently have around ten to fifteen members.”

Powers also said that she thinks the club has a chance at becoming a legitimate team in the future.

“Once we get around 30 members – maybe more, I want to see our club to begin competing at tournaments,” she said.

Although the club is not at an ideal size now, Ferenczy has a specific vision for what he wants the club’s members to take away.

“I just want people in our school to learn about events that are occurring around the world,” Ferenczy said. “We often take our lives for granted, and our generation is going to lead the world in the future. The sooner we become educated on these events, the better.”

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